Banjara Crossbody Bag ~ SKU: banjara-42 ~ bag

SKU: bag-banjara-42
$16.49

Normally: $32.99

Banjara Crossbody Bag ~ SKU: banjara-42 ~ bag
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Banjara Crossbody Bag ~ SKU: banjara-42 ~ bag

SKU: bag-banjara-42
$16.49

Normally: $32.99

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Product Details


This Stunning Coin Clutch Messenger Cross body Handmade Banjara Tribal Bag from Old Vintage Textile with Mirror & Tassels is an over sized envelope-shaped bag made of patchwork antique hand-embroidered cotton textiles, with mirror, pom pom, beaded tassel and old coins. The fabric is antique textiles from Gujarat and Rajasthan that patch worked together and decorated by talented artisans. The inside is fully lined in cotton equipped with an inner pocket with metal zipper closure. Also features a thin braided cotton strap for optional use as a shoulder & cross body bag. Has a flap with a snap button that helps you close easily and a zip pocket inside. This is suitable enough to fit an Ipad and your daily essentials and useful for college and office and combines with any casual outfit. Since the bag it is made from old patches some very small defects may have. Made in India. BAG SIZE= 9" x 9" STRAP SIZE= 60" CARE = dry clean only The Banjara People: The Banjara are a semi-nomadic people who reside mostly in Southern and Middle India. The banjara tribes are believed to be descendants of the Roma gypsies of Europe who migrated through the rugged mountains of Afghanistan, to settle down in the deserts of Rajasthan and many other states in India 2300 years ago. They are known for their colorful costumes. The Banjara women are mostly holding to their ancient mode of dress, which is perhaps the most colorful and elaborate of any tribal group in India. Their full-length skirt is often red with borders embroidered in mustard and green thread and embellished with pieces of mirrored glass that are embroidered on it. Mirror work is the unique feature of Banjara handicraft. Banjaras used mirrors on their clothes to protect themselves from the wild animals. When the wild animals saw themselves into mirrors they ran away. As they lived in the forests, readymade clothes were not available to them. So they used the old clothes and did patchwork to make new clothes.